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Weskalia's Denpa teki na Kanojo Tv Review

Denpa teki na Kanojo Denpa teki na Kanojo Screenshot Juu and Ame. Denpa teki na Kanojo Screenshot Dark alley? Check. Dead body? Check. Ghostly girl? Super check. Denpa teki na Kanojo Screenshot Seeing Rena here, you know what's going to happen next. Denpa teki na Kanojo Screenshot Time's up!

Denpa teki na Kanojo tv Review

Story & Characters

Have you found anime series to be too generic of late? Do you hunger for something creatively different in your anime viewing? Denpa teki na Kanojo may be the series for you. Adapted from the three-volume light novel series by Katayama Kentarou (who also wrote Kure-nai), the anime looks at the biological processes involved in how emotions like fear, hate, and disgust that spawn its characters in an in-depth plot of horror. It also looks great at how psychological trauma can affect a person's fears and perception. The result is a story wholly unlike anything else in its genre, one which, at times, can be quite impressively creepy.

Delinquent student Juuzawa Juu is the kind of guy who wants to be left alone. And it's not really hard thanks to his appearance. His unusual blonde hair, and his face of a thug expression is just naturally intense. Then he's approached by aloof schoolmate Ochibana Ame, who claims that she knew him in a previous life, and pledges her loyalty to him as his knight, he doesn't take kindly to that. But when a close friend is murdered by some notorious serial killer, he sets out to solve the murder himself. In the process Juu uncovers a web of mysteries surrounding the murder victims, the murderer, and his connection to Ame.

The OVA adaptation of Denpa teki na Kanojo actually has only two episodes, with scenarios from the first and the last volumes of the novels. Like Kure-nai, though, it mixes up suspenseful, sometimes intense tales of the psychology with occasional bits of bittersweet redemption.

The first episode delight in the suspense behavior of their story and characters. When playing up the creepiness, the sudden personality shifts, bloody violence, or the tension of the real or imagined threats to Juu, it can have you on the edge of your seat. By the end of the first episode the pattern has been clearly-established: start with a very disturbing and gory scene, switch to normal mode for some, switch the tone suddenly with the revelation of murders and disappearances, and then gradually slip into darker and more disturbing territory as secrets get revealed, ultimately leading to a surprisingly lethal climax. Some of its moments work beautifully, such as the scene in episode one where Juu makes a joke about Ame being a hindrance but their reconciliation is warm enough to deprive Juu's jerkass character from your mind.

And even without its thick layer of atmosphere, even if the big stuff is repetitive boilerplate, there are plenty of little things to set the series' stories apart from the pack. Though not really grand enough to be called a theme, much less a unifying one, Denpa's tales betray a recurrent concern for what happens when ordinary people are given unordinary evil. Apathy, misguided kindness, chivalry, and stark madness all result, also betraying a hidden intelligence. The characters may not be terribly well-written or unique, in the case of Juuzawa Juu, he is no less the sensitive jerk with a heart of gold archetype , but he's not above caring, understanding and chivalrous. Likewise Ame may have the ghostly and distant look, which is a perfect mark to describe the word denpa in the title, but her display in all sort of emotions and her chemistry with Juu are what really shine. Granted, they are hardly an original couple, but their relationship are well-executed.

Rating: 8

Art

As you'd expect given the artistic overlap, Denpa looks a better lot than its elder cousin (or younger in term of the novels serialization). The artistry was done by Kure-nai's mangaka, featuring male lead Juu with his menacing look of a delinquent, while the one young women feature prominently look properly pretty. Ame herself somewhat emphasizes the moe fandom, the distinctive-looking scenes typically when she wears a maid outfit at work, giving her an unexpected but adorable look that far different than her normal one.

Denpa teki na Kanojo is a product of Brains Base, the same studio responsible for Kure-nai (and the recently similar theme Durarara!!). That the two anime have what in common is quite evident in the visual style and composition of the series. Meticulous urban background art provides sufficient detail to make the settings convincing, but the atmosphere alter to suit the more psychological-oriented horror sequences is quite effective. The animation is merely serviceable beyond the way it handles suspense.

Rating: 8

Sound

It's natural for an OVA series like this, the EDs are much simpler, not in theme songs but in the way it was executed by comparison, uses a typical closing credit with no graphical showoff. With the lack of OP, the anime makes up for its beautiful ED themes whose quality varies some but they are generally appealing without being stand-outs. The sonic disjunct also subtly undercuts some of the uglier scenes, adding dark humor to what might otherwise have been merely disturbing.

The two episodes are split with different characters featuring many well-known seiyuu. The results are quite impressive, as nearly all roles are exceptionally well-cast and performances sound smooth and natural. Hosoya Yoshimasa sets the tone from one of his earliest debuts with a wonderful job as Juzawa Ju, Hirohashi Ryou might be a familiar as the voice of Ame as her character is not much different from the girly timid Tamaki she plays in Bamboo Blade, and even Koshimizu Ami's performance conveys the dark attitude and tense approach for her character.

Rating: 8

Presentation

If ever there was a title that really didn't tell you anything about a show, Denpa teki na Kanojo would be a good answer. The reality, however, is that these are the most telling things about Denpa, a show that's all about mystery, intrigue and keeping your cards close to your chest.

And that's really what it does best, throwing out plot points like shrewd bets from a poker-faced card shark. A bold opening move, answered by bluffs, cunning bets and a quick move into the call, where the episode comes to a nail-biting conclusion. Each episode manages to surprise at the end with its expertly woven drama and suspense. All in all, there's a lot here to like, because a lot of the show's appeal will be completely unexpected to most viewers. Denpa teki na Kanojo is gripping to watch, and it's easy to get hooked without even realizing it. It may lack the fanservice and action that draws in the average fan, but it isn't the average show. That said, as short and distant as it can be, the OVA is too well written and executed, to say nothing of entertaining, to dismiss...or miss.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Story: 9
Characters: 8
Art: 8
Animation: 8
Voice: 8
Music: 9
Overall: 8.25

Good:
+Good horror and psychological elements, great storytelling gimmick.
+Slightly mad outcasts, and dark, all-too-human powers.
Bad:
+Too short to be anything attentional.
+Where's the OVA for volume two?

Rating: 8

Final Verdict

8.00 (good)

Reviewed by Weskalia, Apr 05, 2012

Comments

  1. Da-Sarg Apr 12, 2012

    ive watched a few of the anime youve reviewed now and the ones you give a fair to good rating on are pretty good ill be keeping an eye on your reviews for feuture choices on a new series to watch keep up the grate work and thanks for the info

  2. SnickerdoodleNinja Moderator Apr 15, 2012

    Sometimes I'm too wimpy to go for horror shows, but this one actually sounds really interesting. :D I love me some psychology and human motives, so this one might be right up my alley. Plus the cover has a chick with an umbrella on it, and you can't go wrong with umbrellas. Forgive my crackpot comments; my brain has kinda turned to mush from too much homework.

    Anyhow, nice job keeping things straight and to the point! There's no unnecessary fluff and the presentation section is especially well-done. Nice job, and thanks for the review, Wes! :) I'll have to try and check this one out sometime.


  3. CyanideBlizzard Retired Moderator Apr 15, 2012

    One of the things I always loved about this show is, like Snicker, I've actually never been a big horror guy. While I love horror games, and can appreciate a lot of the aspects that horror series bring, I generally avoid them. However, with something like Denpa, it was a completely different scenario. Being an incredibly deep series of character development and a thriller filled with great action I felt extremely grateful for what I stumbled into.

    It's hard for me to talk about Denpa critically, because I find myself having a difficult time finding mistakes in the formula. While short, the show offers two 45 minute episodes which offer us more than enough time to get to know the characters, but also tell a meaningful story. This show is definitely for a mature audience as well. With rape, murder, and philosophical questions posed, this show was incredibly refreshing, and it's something I've gone back and watched numerous times.

    In terms of the review itself, I couldn't of said it better myself. While my scoring would of ultimately been higher, you said everything that I could of ever said and in the best well as well. You kept it critical and more importantly, touched upon the highlights of what makes this worth someones time. Fantastic review, Wes.

    Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to go hunt this down again.

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